Confessin’ The Blues Compilation – Curated by The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones have long been supporters of the Blues from before the start of their career right through to their latest album, Blue & Lonesome which featured their interpretations of the classics, many of which appear in their original versions here on Confessin’ The Blues.

Mick Jagger was an early fan of the Blues: “The first Muddy Waters album that was really popular was Muddy Waters at Newport, which was the first album I ever bought”.

Confessin’ The Blues collects together the greatest bluesmen ever and provides a perfect education to the genre. The tracklisting on the various formats have been chosen by The Rolling Stones, in collaboration with BMG and Universal and will be released on BMG on November 9.

“If you don’t know the blues… there’s no point in picking up the guitar and playing rock and roll or any other form of popular music.” – Keith Richards

The band has decided that 10% of BMG’s net receipts* from the sale of this album will be donated to Willie Dixon’s Blues Heaven Foundation (A registered  US 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization).

‘Confessin’ the Blues’ cover art by Ronnie Wood

Ronnie Wood says: “That’s how Mick and Keith first got close as well, on the train coming back from college. They noticed each other’s record collection and it was, “Hey, you’ve got Muddy Waters. You must be a good guy, let’s form a band”.

Confessin’ the Blues is available to pre-order in several formats, including a two-CD set, a double LP vinyl set, and a special vinyl book pack meant to mimic the original packaging of 78 rpm records. All versions will come with liner notes from music journalist Colin Larkin, while the book pack will feature removable card prints featuring drawings by blues illustrator Christoph Mueller.

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Billy F. Gibbons – The Big Bad Blues

Billy F. Gibbons that bad hombre of Z.Z. Top fame is enamored with the blues. He is releasing a solo album, The Big Bad Blues on September 21, 2018.

The Big Bad Blues

Gibbons said in a statement about the new recording,  “The shift back to the blues is a natural. It’s something which our followers can enjoy with the satisfaction of experiencing the roots tradition and, at the same time, feeling the richness of stretching the art form.”

Fried Chicken Man.

 

Westport 6th Annual Blues, Views & BBQ Festival

The 6th Annual Westport Blues, Views & BBQ Festival takes place Saturday August 31 and Sunday September 1. Westport is responsible for shaping my music consciousness the past 45 years.

I have seen several notable acts at Staples High School such as The Youngbloods, J Geils Band, Tom Hardin, Delaney and Bonnie and Friends, Taj Mahal (with the Howard Johnson Tuba Orchestra), The Mahavishnu Orchestra , and Peter Frampton.

There was the venerable Players Tavern an intimate club setting where I saw Muddy Waters, Peter Tosh, Toots and the Maytals, Pat Metheny, Richie Havens, and Melanie.

I like the idea of gastronomic delights intermixed with great blues/rock music. Feed the stomach and nurture the soul.

Sunday September 1st’s schedule features:

Howlin’ Wolf (Chester Arthur Burnett)

Buddy Guy‘s audio biography, Why I Left Home: My Story is enhancing my understanding about key blues practitioners. I enjoy hearing Buddy Guy share his personal memories about The Mud (Muddy Waters), B.B. King, Willie Dixon and Howlin’ Wolf. Each day I listen to more chapters then I look up the blues artists Buddy speaks with reverence.

Buddy Guy wrote these words about Howlin’ Wolf  for Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Artists List.

Wolf

He was so exciting to be on a show with. Wolf was a big man, but he could really move. It was like when the Chicago Bears had that player the Refrigerator. People think football players can’t move when they’re that big. And people expected the Wolf, because he was such a big guy, to just sit in a chair and belt it out. No, man, he had all that action. He had everything you wanted to see. He’d crawl around, jump around. His fists were as big as a car tire. And he would ball that fist up. When I started getting calls to come and play on some cuts behind him, I’d think, “Oh, shit, I better play right.” I’d heard he was mean. I was told that. But, you know, I never had a cross word with the man the whole time, right up to when he passed away.

Source: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-artists-of-all-time-19691231/howlin-wolf-20110420#ixzz2J1spOfbF 

Muddy Waters – Folk Singer

NPR Jazz’s Take 5 Weekly Jazz sampler on A Blog Supreme features five great blues songs chosen by Nick Morrison

5 Blues Songs That Feel Your Midwinter Chill

This blues song, “Cold Weather Blues”  from my favorite blues artists, Muddy Waters will surely cure your Winter blues.

Cover art to Muddy Waters' Folk Singer LP.

Live at the Checkerboard Lounge

I was awakened at 2 a.m. this morning to an intimate blues get together broadcast on PBS Channel 13. The show starred Muddy Waters at Buddy Guy’s Checkerboard Lounge on the South Side of Chicago. The show was filmed on November 22, 1981 (31 years ago). The Rolling Stones had stopped by to gig and see their friend and hero Muddy Waters.

They are accompanied onstage by such blues luminaries as Junior Wells on vocals and harp, Buddy Guy and Lefty Dizz on blues guitar. Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood were like three sons returning home to see their Father at Thanksgiving time. Muddy seemed really happy to have his children by his side.

The club was very small. I watched in amazement as Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood climbed on top of the tables and took the stage. Muddy Waters was in great form performing many of his blues classics. Mick Jagger sang along with total reverence for Muddy and his infamous blues songs.

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The highlight for me was “Champagne and Reefer”. I love the scene where Muddy Waters is handed a marijuana stalk with fresh green buds. He just laughs as we all do at that point 😉

Gimme champagne when I get thirsty

Gimme a reefer when I want to get high

I must get this CD/DVD set. I so love and miss Muddy Waters :). I am so thankful this historic occasion is captured on film for us to relive and enjoy.

What’s Up With Tom Waits?

Permission to Come Aboard?

A very mysterious press release from Tom Waits landed in inboxes this morning at exactly 10 a.m. The subject line read: “Tom Waits: Permission to Come Aboard,” and attached is a photo of the songwriter dressed as a pirate, complete with an eyepatch and a sword. The only words are “Coming August 7th.”

Is Waits announcing a tour? He did perform on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon and The Late Show with David Letterman in early July, and he has yet to tour beyond his 2011 LP, Bad As Me.

Waits could actually be announcing a Tom Waits cruise next week?

July 9th, 2012,  The Late Show with David Letterman

Interview segment

Performance segment

July 10th, 2012, Late Night With Jimmy Fallon

Joining Waits on stage to perform were his son Casey on drums, long time bassist Larry Taylor, guitarist David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), keyboardist Augie Myers and guitarist Big Bill Morganfield (son of Muddy Waters). Amazing players and another genius Tom Waits performance.

Canned Heat, Don’t Forget To Boogie

Canned Heat played a definitive role in establishing the blues with sixties generation music fans. They cemented their role as blues foundation artists delineating the sounds known as blues-rock and boogie.  Members of Canned Heat were serious blues music collectors who remained true to the principles of the blues through their music.

The video sequence of Canned Heat from Monterey Pop in 1967 shows the band getting down in earnest pleasing the afternoon crowd with the Muddy Waters classic, “Rollin’ and Tumblin'”. Take special note of Larry “The Mole” Taylor on bass, dual guitarists Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson and Henry Vestine, with Bob “The Bear” Hite onvocals.

Many people are familiar with Canned Heat’s headlining role at Woodstock and how their song “Going Up The Country” is considered the unofficial theme song  for Woodstock, the movie.

This is my favorite video of Canned Heat at Woodstock. Bob “The Bear” Hite epitomized the festival of peace and music by allowing this fan to hang on stage with him, even after he took a cigarette from his t-shirt pocket 😉

I was lucky to see Canned Heat on August 14th, 2009 during the Heroes of Woodstock Tour at Foxwoods. You hope in your heart that they will be able to rekindle the classic sound you had grown up with live. When Country Joe McDonald asked us, “Are you ready to boogie with Canned Heat?”, we was as was Canned Heat that night. It was just like yesterday but even better.

 

Winter + The Blues = Johnny Winter

Winter + The Blues = Johnny Winter, so what better blues man to feature next than Texas guitarist Johnny Winter.

I recall with great enthusiasm when Johnny Winter burst upon the music scene in 1969. The force of this Texas tornado could be felt from his very first notes. What I like the most about Johnny Winter is that mean ass cat growl of his coupled with the real hot guitar slinging. You immediately feel his pain as it resonates through your bones. Johnny was promoted as the white blues superstar by CBS Records.

One of my favorite early live recordings of Johnny Winter took place at The Fillmore East on December 13, 1968. For many years these concert tapes were lost. But thanks to the efforts of Al Kooper they have resurfaced. This east coast live version of Super Session featured Al Kooper on keyboards and Mike Bloomfield on guitar. Mike Bloomfield introduces Johnny Winter with a raw intensity that sets the stage for this unique collaboration of Kooper, Bloomfield and Winter. According to Al Kooper this is the music moment that captivated the CBS Records representatives attention to pursue and sign Johnny Winter. Not bad for Johnny Winter’s first night ever in New York City at 24 years of age, don’t you think 😉

I have to give the late Mike Bloomfield credit, he non-selfishly promoted blues artists who needed the exposure with the Fillmore audiences. Mike Bloomfield was responsible for convincing Bill Graham to book B.B. King at the Fillmore West in San Francisco. This turned out to be a major cross-over moment for the King of the Blues with the flower power generation. No wonder B.B. King thought of Mike Bloomfield like a son.  Bloomfield paved the way for his old friend Johnny Winter with a strong pat on the back at the Fillmore East.

Johnny Winter’s second official album on Columbia Records, Johnny Winter exhibited Johnny’s strong command of the blues studio production. Recorded in Nashville, Tennesee with Johnny’s band Winter, which included “Uncle” John Turner on percussion and Tommy Shannon on electric bass. Tommy Shannon later played with Stevie Ray Vaughn & Double Trouble.  The Johnny Winter album also featured Willie Dixon on acoustic bass, Walter “Shakey” Horton on harp and Johnny’s brother Edgar Winter on piano and alto sax. Johnny was the producer and the ever present production genius Eddie Kramer (Jimi Hendrix’s producer) was the production consultant and photographer. Eddie Kramer shot the photograph of Johnny Winter featured on the cover.

This is Tommy Shannon’s favorite video of Winter live. It was recorded at Montreux in Switzerland in 1970. It captures the band at a high peak.