It’s Alive! Classic Horror and Sci-Fi Art from the Kirk Hammett Collection

A couple of weeks ago we attended the “It’s Alive” exhibit at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts.

There are 100+ items on display curated from Kirk Hammett of Metallica’s private collection.

Like Kirk, I grew up as an early teen reading everything I could find about horror and sci-fi movies.  The definitive information source in the early 60’s were the Famous Monsters of Filmland and Spacemen magazines which I would buy at the local variety store.

Forrest J. Ackerman(Forry) was our monster movie subject matter authority.  He was Editor for Famous Monsters/Spacemen. He had an extensive memorabilia archive of 36,000+ items at his three Ackermansions. I learned a great deal from his authoritative articles that highlighted rare movie stills from such classics as King Kong, Bride of Frankenstein, and Dracula. His favorite sci-fi movie that he turned me on to was Metropolis by Fritz Lang (1927).

I collect music posters and they adorn many walls in my house. I gained a deeper appreciation for the rare movie posters in Kirk’s collection as an art form. Many of the posters on display were from Universal Pictures.  I never fathomed how many movies Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi had made either individually or in collaboration.

If I had to choose one poster that enchanted me most it was the French movie poster of Frankenstein (1931) with the rare graveyard scene.

I deeply thank Kirk Hammett for sharing his private collection with the public.  I also want to thank Peabody Essex Museum for the fantastic exhibition. It brought back many deep-seated memories seeing the Universal Movie posters, lobby cards and giant green Space Invader from Mars alien.

It’s Alive! Classic Horror and Sci-Fi Art from the Kirk Hammett Collection is on view until November 26.

Lars Ulrich, Howard Stern Discuss Lulu, Closing Track “Junior Dad”

Lars Ulrich phoned in to Howard Stern‘s show today. They discussed in detail the Lou Reed & Metallica collaboration, Lulu.

Howard Stern corrected his earlier misinterpretation of Lulu:

Howard took the opportunity to commend (unlike many critics*) the band’s recent album, “Lulu,” a collaborative effort with Lou Reed–particularly “Junior Dad”, the album’s 20-minute final track: “I started crying. It got me. I loved it–no bullshit!”
Lars laughed that Howard wasn’t the only one: “You should have seen grown men cry out in the studio when we were recording it. I’m telling you, I’ve been with James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett for close to 20 years and I’ve never seen them cry before. It was amazing. It was truly moving.”
*Uncut gave the record a positive review,[34] singling out the album closer “Junior Dad” for praise and calling it “breathtaking” and “astonishing”, a “perfect ending to the most extraordinary, passionate and just plain brilliant record either participant has made for a long while.”