My Sunday Feeling – Jethro Tull

This Was
Image via Wikipedia

This is a classic song for an Indian Summer Sunday afternoon.  “My Sunday Feeling” is taken from the debut Jethro Tull album, This Was (1968)  featuring Ian Anderson on vocals and flute, Mick Abrahams on guitar, Glenn Cornick on bass and Clive Bunker on drums

Jim Capaldi &Traffic

This morning I received an interesting e-mail from Genesis Publications. They are a limited edition, specialty music book publisher from England that “produce lushly designed rock photo books.” – N.Y. Times

I received advance notification of a book title of keen interest to my music collection.  Mr. Fantasy, The Lyrics of Jim Capaldi. I greatly admire and respect, Jim Capaldi the backbone of Traffic.

There was a time in my life (1968-1971) where the only two bands that mattered were Jethro Tull and Traffic. I was a fervent fan of these two English music groups. I went to their live concerts at the Fillmore East and the Capitol Theatre in Portchester, N.Y. 

I even bought an exact replica of the stars shirt that Steve Winwood is wearing on stage in this photograph. It caught him by surprise that I was wearing that same shirt in the audience (7th row center) on the evening that this set list was based upon. Notice that Scott Muni introduces Traffic that night 😉 (A correction to the dates of these recorded June shows, they were June 26 & June 27 ,1971, I know I have the ticket stubs to prove it!)

File:WNEW1027.pngTraffic was a special group with a magical mix of musicians. I learned about Traffic by listening to the radio show, Things From England that Scott Muni hosted on WNEW-FM102.7 on Friday afternoons. WNEW-FM, a Metromedia affiliate out of New York City had a major influence on my musical tastes. WNEW-FM’s progressive rock format created an intellectual music platform that we devoutly followed all hours of the day and night.

My favorite Traffic album is Traffic (1968).

File:Traffic (album).jpg

Jethro Tull – Look Into The Sun

Cover of "Stand Up"
Cover of Stand Up

Did you ever have a song that sweetly haunts your sensibilities answering age old questions in its consummate verse? Look Into The Sun is that song for me and has been playing in my head for a few days now.  I love the symbolism of summer as a female figure being we are on the crest of summer right now.

I saw Jethro Tull on their Stand Up tour at the Fillmore East in NY City on July 3, 1969. Look Into The Sun was a highlight of their set that summer evening at the East Village legendary rock hall.

Look Into The Sun from the Jethro Tull Stand Up (1969) recording. Written by Ian Anderson, Copyright Chrysalis Music (ASCAP)”

 

 

Look Into The Sun

Took a sad song of one sweet evening
I smiled and quickly turned away.
It’s not easy singing sad songs
but still the easiest way I have to say.

So when you look into the sun
and see the things we haven’t done —
oh was it better then to run
than to spend the summer crying.
Now summer cannot come anyway.

I had waited for time to change her.
The only change that came was over me.
She pretended not to want love —
I hope she was only fooling me.

So when you look into the sun
look for the pleasures nearly won.
Or was it better then to run
than to spend the summer singing.
And summer could have come in a day.

So if you hear my sad song singing
remember who and what you nearly had.
It’s not easy singing sad songs
when you can sing the song to make me glad.

So when you look into the sun
and see the words you could have sung:
It’s not too late, only begun,
we can still make summer.
Yes, summer always comes anyway.

So when you look into the sun
and see the words you could have sung:
It’s not too late, only begun.
Look into the sun.

Jethro Tull – Look Into The Sun

Cover of "Stand Up"
Cover of Stand Up

Did you ever have a song that sweetly haunts your sensibilities answering age old questions in its consummate verse? Look Into The Sun is that song for me and has been playing in my head for a few days now.  I love the symbolism of summer as a female figure being we are on the crest of summer right now.

I saw Jethro Tull on their Stand Up tour at the Fillmore East in NY City on July 3, 1969. Look Into The Sun was a highlight of their set that summer evening at the East Village legendary rock hall.

Look Into The Sun from the Jethro Tull Stand Up (1969) recording. Written by Ian Anderson, Copyright Chrysalis Music (ASCAP)”

 

 

Look Into The Sun

Took a sad song of one sweet evening
I smiled and quickly turned away.
It’s not easy singing sad songs
but still the easiest way I have to say.

So when you look into the sun
and see the things we haven’t done —
oh was it better then to run
than to spend the summer crying.
Now summer cannot come anyway.

I had waited for time to change her.
The only change that came was over me.
She pretended not to want love —
I hope she was only fooling me.

So when you look into the sun
look for the pleasures nearly won.
Or was it better then to run
than to spend the summer singing.
And summer could have come in a day.

So if you hear my sad song singing
remember who and what you nearly had.
It’s not easy singing sad songs
when you can sing the song to make me glad.

So when you look into the sun
and see the words you could have sung:
It’s not too late, only begun,
we can still make summer.
Yes, summer always comes anyway.

So when you look into the sun
and see the words you could have sung:
It’s not too late, only begun.
Look into the sun.