Zev Feldman, Jazz EthnoMusicologist

Zev Feldman is the  jazz ethnomusicologist. His innate discovery  sense is equal to Alan Lomax in folk music circles and Chris Strachwitz with the blues idiom. Zev is a consummate journeyman who secures unreleased jazz treasures for Resonance Records. His jazz subject matter authority role is validated by  the Stereophile November 2016 article, “Finding Neverland, Zev Feldman Becomes the Most Famous Sleuth in Jazz”.

Resonance Records raised my collector consciousness by bringing us, John Coltrane’s “Offering: Live At Temple University” and Larry Young’s “In Paris: The ORTF Recordings”,  in addition to other jazz classics on the label. (Gain further insight via the Resonance sampler, “Various Artists – Jazz Haunts & Magic Vaults: The New Lost Classics of Resonance Records, Volume 1” on Spotify or Apple Music).

Record Store Day 2017

Looking ahead to next Spring’s 2017 Record Store Day (RSD), Zev and Resonance will be issuing a Jaco Pastorius set of previously unreleased big-band recordings made in 1982.

Zev Feldman shared an exciting update on Facebook recently about the future Jaco recording.

On Friday I had the pleasure of interviewing Metallica’s famed bassist extraordinaire, Robert Trujillo. Robert’s been gracious to write liner notes for an upcoming Resonance Jaco Pastorius album I’m producing coming (just in time for the tenth anniversary of Record Store Day, next April 15, 2017). More to come but I’ll disclose we have an epic two-hour recording made of Jaco Pastorius in glorious 24-track audio from 1982. This will be an official release with the Pastorius family. Mr. Trujillo shared with us his personal connection to this iconic artist and he didn’t hold back. We’ll be creating a new video featuring Robert which will celebrate the new album. If you haven’t seen it yet, be sure to go to Netflix now and watch Trujillo’s documentary “Jaco.” It’s a great film and it’s an honor to work with this passionate, good guy. Stay tuned. More to come. Thanks to my colleagues Zak Shelby-Szysko and Fran Gala for all of their help. Extra special thanks to Michael Kurtz for introducing us.

I own Jaco, The World’s Greatest Bass Player the documentary that Zev mentions above. It is gripping and soulful in scope. My record collection features several Jaco RSD exclusives. I love the steps Zev Feldman is taking to cultivate a well-documented Jaco vinyl package for next years RSD release.

I am thankful for the attention to detail Zev Feldman exercises for jazz music lovers. He’s never stopped being a jazz music fan and his personal sacrifice is our delight. I see another Grammy Award Jazz Reissue in the future for you and Resonance Records Zev!

Samuel Charters, Blues Hall of Fame 2011 Inductee

The Blues Foundation will be holding their annual Blues Hall of Fame induction on May 4, 2011. It’s part of their annual Blues Music Awards event.  I would love to go to Memphis, Tennessee some day with Rosemary and be an active part of this event. So yes, this is a bucket list item for me 😉

The Blues Hall of Fame Inductee who I am writing my daily blog post about is Samuel Charters.  I was conducting research for a future daily blog post about the Albert King with Stevie Ray Vaughn In Session CD/DVD recording when I happened upon Samuel Charters name as the person who wrote the liner notes for this auspicious blues event.

I pride myself as an amateur ethnomusicologist.  I graduated from the University of New Haven, minoring in music and ethnomusicology was my heart of hearts goal in 1974. I haven’t let go of staying in league with music study. I value music historians such as Alan Lomax and music journalists such as Peter Guralnick , Paul Oliver and Robert Palmer. It stands to reason that Samuel Charters would be on my radar screen as a blues music subject matter authority.

Samuel Charters (81 years young)  is being deservedly recognized for his vast contribution to the study and promotion of the blues music idiom. Samuel Charters has written seven books about the blues. He is also a noted subject matter authority on jazz and has written six titles about jazz.

His book The Country Blues is a definitive publication that sews together the threads of blues history in a musical and cultural quilt. It was, in his words, “an effort to force the white society to reconsider some of its racial attitudes, although it was a cry for help” for the blues artists.

What I find very fascinating is the contribution Samuel Charters, along with his wife Ann Charters have made to the legacy of music and literature. The Charters have collected substantive information about the blues, jazz, and African diaspora music. Ann is a noted subject matter authority on the Beat Generation which is another developing interest of mine. She wrote the first Jack Kerouac biography (which received co-operation from Kerouac himself).

Ann Charters is  a professor of American Literature at UCONN. Please take note of her illustrious curriculum vitae. http://english.uconn.edu/directory/uploads/cvs/charters.pdf

Samuel and Ann Charters split their time today between Sweden where they live (they grew disenchanted with the American political landscape and who could blame them) and the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut. They have unselfishly donated several large collections to UCONN’s Thomas J. Dodd Research Center for ongoing scholarly research.

I plan to spend some quality time researching a book I want to write at this facility. I can’t wait to pour through their exhaustive collection. Samuel and Ann Charters Archive of Blues and Vernacular African American Musical Culture

Thank you Ann and Samuel Charters for your devotion to the preservation of arts and literature! You enhance scholarly pursuit of the origins of music and the beat generation with very skillful detail.


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