Santana Record Store Day Exclusive Release

Record Store Day is celebrated on Saturday April 13, 2019. Santana collectors will enjoy hunting for this new 7″ vinyl recording Breaking Down The Door (Concord Records). It offers a focus track from the forthcoming full length Santana album, Africa Speaks plus an exclusive bonus track.

This album was produced with the guidance of legendary Rick Rubin. It is due to drop on Friday June 7, 2019. CD Copies of Africa Speaks are free for Santana Global Consciousness 2019 tour ticket holders.

The RSD exclusive release features the artistry of songstress Concha Buika, known as the Queen of Latin Vocal Jazz.

The A side is “Breaking Down The Door”. Written by Carlos Santana, Concha Buika, Drew Gonsalves, Ivan Duran, Manu Chao, and Rafael de León.

”Breaking Down The Door” is an adaptation of the song Abatina by Calypso Rose (The song authors are listed in bold in the previous paragraph.) This will be one of the anticipated 14 to 20 Africa Speaks tracks.

The bonus B side is “Dolor De Rumba”. Written by Carlos Santana, Concha Buika, and Ebo Taylor. It is a derivative of the original song “Twer Nyame” by renowned afro-beat Ghanaian guitarist Ebo Taylor.


Santana Album Cover Signed

I love music memorabilia. I collect tour programs, music pins, posters, signed CD and album covers.

One of my favorite pieces in my collection is the first Santana album signed by the original band members, Carlos Santana, Gregg Rolie, and Michael Shrieve.

I am hoping to get Michael Carabello and Jose “Chepito” Areas to sign this album cover someday.

Michael Carabello has shown up to play unannounced twice at live concerts I have attended. I saw him play with The Steve Miller Band and with Santana in Connecticut. I just didn’t have this album with me those evenings.

The quest continues 🙂

Let There Be Peace On Earth

My favorite spiritual hymn is, “Let There Be Peace on Earth”, by Jill Jackson and Sy Miller.

Jill Jackson

Let there be peace on earth,
and let it begin with me;
let there be peace on earth,
the peace that was meant to be.

With God our creator,
family all are we.
Let us walk with each other
in perfect harmony.*

* © 1955 Jan-Lee Music, renewed 1983. Used by permission; all rights reserved.

“When I attempted suicide [in 1944] and I didn’t succeed,” Jill Jackson said, “I knew for the first time unconditional love—which God is. You are totally loved, totally accepted, just the way you are. At that moment I was not allowed to die, and something happened to me, which is very difficult to explain. I had an eternal moment of truth, in which I knew I was loved, and I knew I was here for a purpose.”

This realization was followed by years of exploring her spiritual nature and her relationship with God. Jackson discovered her love for writing and began writing songs with Sy Miller after they married in 1949.

In 1955, she wrote the lyrics for “Let There Be Peace on Earth” while her husband wrote the melody. The song was introduced at a California retreat to a group of young people who were from a wide variety of religious, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. The young people had come together for a weeklong experience devoted to developing friendship and understanding through education, discussion and working together. The song’s focus on peace and God made it easy to cross many boundaries.

Sy Miller wrote about the effect of the song: “One summer evening in 1955, a group of 180 teenagers of all races and religions, meeting at a workshop high in the California mountains locked arms, formed a circle and sang a song of peace. They felt that singing the song, with its simple basic sentiment—‘Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me’—helped to create a climate for world peace and understanding.

“When they came down from the mountain, these inspired young people brought the song with them and started sharing it. And, as though on wings, ‘Let There Be Peace on Earth’ began an amazing journey around the globe. It traveled first, of course, with the young campers back to their homes and schools, churches and clubs.”

Miller noted that the song was then shared in all 50 states at school graduations, PTA meetings, holiday gatherings, celebrations of Brotherhood Week, Veterans Day, Human Rights Day and United Nations Day. Kiwanis clubs sang it, as well as 4-H clubs, United Auto Workers, the American Legion, the B’nai B’rith and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE).

The song was taped, copied, printed in songbooks and passed by word of mouth. Eventually, it spread overseas, sung by Maoris in New Zealand and Zulus in Africa.

In 2009 Random House published “Let There Be Peace on Earth” as a children’s book.

Peace

The above information is lovingly shared from History of Hymns, authored by Dr. C. Michael Hawn a professor of sacred music at Perkins School of Theology, SMU.

Santana Rynearson Stadium

I am usually leery of artist “bootleg” or non-official recordings. They typically lack the production results I want.  My music collection is  99% official commercial music releases.

My niece gave me a wonderful Christmas gift surprise this year. The vinyl recording, “Santana Rynearson Stadium, Ypsilanti MI, 25-05-75”. I had never seen or heard of this live recording. I was happily stunned 🙂

Klondike Records has done Santana and the listener justice. This recording is based on a King Biscuit Flower Hour radio broadcast. It is Digital Remastered and pressed onto 180 Grade vinyl. It sounds great on my Audio Technica turntable.

Santana was the headline act that day with Special Guest Stars, Peter Frampton’s Camel, and Lynard Skynard.