The Year of The Doors Starts Today

2102, The Year of The Doors is upon us. The 40th Anniversary of L.A. Woman is being celebrated in high fashion today, January 9th. The World Premiere of the first completely new and unreleased track by The Doors in 40 years, “She Smells So Nice” can be heard on Sound Cloud here.

This unique gem was found by co-producer Bruce Botnick when he was reviewing the L.A. Woman session tapes for the upcoming reissue.

The Doors L.A. Woman 40th Anniversary merchandise will start shipping on or about January 20th, 2012.

There will be a two CD re-issue of the original album, remastered, with an extra disc of bonus material. Disc two has previously unreleased alternate versions of songs featured on the original album along with studio chatter by the band from the recording sessions. Liner notes written by David Fricke, Sr. Editor of Rolling Stone magazine, and original album producer Bruce Botnick.

There will also be a DVD, Mr. Mojo Risin’: The Story of L.A. Woman. Eagle Rock Entertainment has created this documentary detailing how The Doors created their last studio album. Mr Mojo Risin’ goes into detail of how the album came about, its recording and what was happening to the band at the time. The story is told through new interviews with the three surviving Doors: Ray Manzarek, Robbie Krieger and John Densmore plus contributions from Jac Holzman, founder of their label, Elektra Records, Bill Siddons, their manager, Bruce Botnick, engineer and co-producer of the album and others associated with the Doors at this time. The show includes archive footage of the Doors performing both live and in the studio, classic photographs and new musical demonstrations from the Doors.

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Van Halen Tour and New Album – The Excitement Buzz Continues

Last night Van Halen played at Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village for 250 people. I applaud them for igniting such a major excitement buzz for their 2o12 tour and their forthcoming album A Different Kind of Truth.  The NY Times article, “Van Halen Delivers Big Nostalgia on a Small Stage” by James McKinley Jr. proved to be an insightful read for those of us who were curious about last night’s event.

Photograph by Charles Sykes/Associated Press

I’m setting my sights on trying to get tickets for the Mohegan Sun March 3rd concert. Live Nation is handling the tour so I will need to use my account  with them to purchase seats. I like that Kool & The Gang will be the opening act.

Van Halen on Tour 2012

I received an email yesterday from Interscope Records simply entitled, “Van Halen – The Future”. I interpret it to mean that Van Halen will have a brand new album that they will be highlighting with a tour. The tour tickets start selling January 10th. The hint is to stay tuned on January 10th for more details about where they will be playing.

I’m in, aren’t you? Eddie Van Halen plays the bitch-ingest guitar I have ever seen live. Would love to catch him with Alex, Wolfgang and David Lee Roth. Worth trying to get tickets to see them.

Check out the dog on the stage as David Lee Roth dances by, he looks happy 😉

Van Halen- The Future

Jefferson Airplane – Crown of Creation

The first album I owned by Jefferson Airplane was Crown of Creation, their fourth album. I was a late bloomer to the album rock sound of JA. I was familiar with their hits “White Rabbit” and “Somebody To Love” from extensive AM and FM radio airplay in 1967. It took me longer to establish an immediacy with their album content.

I’ll never quite understand why I didn’t own Surrealistic Pillow first as it was their most accessible and known album.

I fully embraced Crown of Creation when it was released in September of 1968. I loved many of the songs on this album. I was working part-time in a grocery store in those days, so I had a little more “pocket-money” to spend on vinyl LPs. I remember picking it off the rack on the wall at the record store in downtown Norwalk that I haunted frequently. The cover with its fiery mushroom cloud called to me.

File:JA Crown-Of-Creation.jpg

My favorite track on Crown of Creation is “Lather“.  It was written about Spencer Dryden (drummer), Grace Slick‘s lover then turning 30. I love when the word, “Child” is whispered at the beginning of the song…

According to the Wikipedia article on Lather (The Song):

“But Lather still finds it a nice thing to do,
To lie about nude in the sand,
Drawing pictures of mountains that look like bumps,

And thrashing the air with his hands.”

This section of the lyrics actually refer to the occasion when bassist Jack Casady was arrested nude on a beach in Santa Cruz, California, while on drugs.

Capitol Theatre in Portchester, NY Plans Triumphant 2012 Return, Part I

The concert venue that started me on my journey to attend live music events for 42 years is the Capitol Theatre in Portchester, NY. It was a haven of great music in the early 1970s. I attended 12 concerts there from 1970 through 1974. I am elated to learn The Capitol Theatre will resume its preeminent role as a concert venue in our market in 2012.

The New York Times music section featured an informative article yesterday about The Capitol Theatre titled, “Live Music to Return to a Storied Theater” by C.J. Hughes. (See Related Articles link below).

The gist of the article is that Peter Shapiro who owns the Brooklyn Bowl plans to produce 100 performances a year there. The Capitol will undergo a two million dollar, four-month renovation project. This could translate into a late spring/early summer grand re-opening. Peter Shapiro is also the publisher of Relix magazine, which provides excellent coverage of the jam band scene.

I’ve never been to the Brooklyn Bowl but my son has and he really likes the venue. I am a long time reader of Relix. The magazine does a fine job of covering the alternative and rock music scene. Peter Shapiro is very well-connected in the music industry and this bodes well for us concert goers. The addition of The Capitol to the New York/Connecticut market sharpens the competition for the concert dollar. I think this may cause a couple of existing promoters to be more price competitive now.

The proximity of The Capitol Theatre in Portchester, NY was beneficial for Fairfield County Connecticut residents. The lower drinking age of 18 just across the state line made it attractive to see shows there. Portchester was more adjacent than The Fillmore East in the East Village of New York City. I find it amazing that Howard Stein was able to book so many premium top rock acts at The Capitol in lieu of New York City and Bill Graham’s organization. It’s going to get interesting with Connecticut having so many venues in 2011, such as the casinos, The Ridgefield Playhouse, The Klein and The Fairfield Theatre and Infinity Hall. My concert dance card will be full later on in the 2012 season. 🙂

The NY Times Capitol Theatre article motivated me to finally write this music blog post. In order to do the topic justice, I will break the blog post in two parts. As a faithful progressive music listener, I would heard The Capitol Theater radio advertisements on WNEW-FM 102.7. My second concert at The Capitol was Traffic, Silver Metre and Swallow on June 27, 1970. We attended the 8 p.m. early show. I was fortunate to be able to buy tickets in those days at a local head shop in Norwalk, Ct. The shop owner always offered us seventh-row center seating.

The English Rock Groups at The Capitol Theatre

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Traffic and Jethro Tull were my favorite two bands in 1970. I recall that Steve Winwood wore a long sleeve white t-shirt that was covered in silver stars. It was a shirt I would later buy at the same head shop that sold me tickets and wear it the next time we saw Traffic, much to Steve Winwood’s chagrin. (He kept looking over at me puzzled where I got the shirt I was guessing…) Traffic consisted of Steve Winwood on Hammond B3 organ, guitar and vocals, Chris Wood on saxophone and flute and Jim Capaldi drums and vocals.

Notice on the bootleg cover that Steve Winwood is wearing the shirt I mentioned in the picture from that night. The two songs I remember the most from Traffic’s set were “40,000 Headmen” with Chris Wood playing the flute and “Pearly Queen”, which featured Steve Winwood performing a riveting guitar solo.

Our third concert was Jethro Tull, McKendree Spring and Livingston Taylor which again was an early show. Jethro Tull featured their third album Benefit that night. It was my second time seeing Jethro Tull (the first time was at The Fillmore East in July of 1969). It was our first Livingston Taylor concert. Little did we realize we would see Liv nine more times in later years. We bought his first record on Capricorn Records the following day as we fell in love with his music and charming wit.

I am going to go out of chronological order here to collect the acts we saw at The Capitol Theatre under the proper headings. We saw Traffic again on Halloween night, 10/31/70.  By then Traffic was increasing strongly in popularity due to FM airplay and the chart success of John Barleycorn Must Die. We noticed that the audience was more enthusiastic the second time we saw Traffic. It felt like a band I had treasured for my listening pleasure was beginning to move out of my reach. But isn’t that the way it’s supposed to work in music industry circles.

We experienced this again six months later with Jethro Tull on 4/27/71 at the late show. Aqualung was receiving lots of accolades from the music critics and was getting heavy airplay on FM stations like WNEW-FM and WPLJ-FM out of New York City. My request to interview Ian Anderson and the band for our local college radio station was turned down the day of the concert by their publicist. She felt we were too small a radio station and market for the fast rising Jethro Tull. The audience was ravenous for Tull that night and I could feel the band being swept along by the success of Aqualung. Having been a loyal fan of Jethro Tull for three years I should have been psyched for their greater acceptance instead of feeling like others were tearing them away from our midst.

It proved monumental that The Capitol Theatre served as the launchpad for the fueling rocket success of Traffic and Jethro Tull in America.

Part II of my music blog about The Capitol Theatre early concert years will be posted tomorrow. It will cover the San Francisco era with such bands as Santana, The Grateful Dead, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna and Big Brother and the Holding Company.

Grand Funk Railroad – An American Supergroup

English: Grand Funk Railroad in their heyday!!
Image via Wikipedia

Looking back to the year 1969 there was a lot of great music happening. Grand Funk Railroad began their career on vinyl that year with the recording, On Time released the same month as Woodstock. It didn’t get a lot of first attention on the radio, I know I never heard it. The first single they released was, “Time Machine” in July of 1969. It barely broke through the Billboard Top 50 singles chart. But a bigger future was brewing for Grand Funk Railroad.

Grand Funk (album)
Image via Wikipedia

Grand Funk Railroad started to percolate with their second album, Grand Funk, released at the end of 1969. They were perfectly situated to ride the tsunami wave of the Age of Aquarius 1970 which was a paramount year for music. The red album caught on like wildfire. Everybody I knew was raving about Grand Funk. I wasn’t sold on Grand Funk at all. I thought they were crap to be quite honest with you. I would get into some heated debates with my friends about their sound.

It turned out I was wrong about Grand Funk Railroad (although many music critics agreed with me…). They continued to accelerate on the charts, the radio and with fans. Their third album, Closer to Home broke the band into super group level (it is double platinum). “I’m Your Captain (Closer to Home)” proved to be a major classic hit on progressive FM radio where they would play the entire 10 minute track (it was a 5:31 length single).

Closer to Home
Image via Wikipedia

The three members Don Brewer, Mel Schacher, and Mark Farner featured prominently on the cover of Closer to Home. I bought this album in 1970 as my opinion began to change about Grand Funk Railroad. I regret not ever seeing them live as an original power trio. They hold the record in 1971 of breaking The Beatles’ Shea Stadium attendance record by selling out in just 72 hours.

I did get to see Grand Funk Railroad later in my life. I first caught Mark Farner in 2001 at the Milford Oyster Festival for free. That was a cool outside show on Fowler Field.

Then we saw Grand Funk Railroad with Don and Mel at Mohegan Sun‘s Wolf Den. Don took his drum stick and threw it in the air and it landed right at my feet. I have it in my memorabilia collection now. It’s the only drum stick I have ever gotten at a live concert (close to 500 concerts in 42+ years).

I have seen Don Brewer playing drums for Bob Seger’s Silver Bullet Band twice as well.