Music eBooks

I am considering a shift in the MusicOfOurHeart to focus exclusively on music books. I was asked for the first time to review a new music book by a leading publisher last month. They sent me the hard copy edition which I am reading and enjoying. I wonder how much closer I would be in completing this book review if I was reading the eBook edition on my iPad?

I have a couple of music book projects in development. The plan is to (self)publish these works as eBook titles with integrated Web linking. Everyone is reading more HTML5 content with Web eyeballs. That’s where my eBook content needs to be.

I work with eBooks every day in the technology curriculum I manage for my employer.  We are an eBook centrist learning institute, with VitalSource.

The WordPress 5.0 Gutenberg Editor is imminent which will make adding rich content for WordPress authors a simple and enjoyable taskPublishing an eBook on the WordPress platform is the likely route for me to pursue.

eBooks.com is a popular ebook retailer with a reputation for innovation, integrity, and independence. They sell ebooks direct to millions of consumers around the world, with five local sales portals in the US, Canada, UK, Europe and Australia.

eBooks

I like the fact that they sell 11,341 music eBooks. eBooks now serve as my primary music eBook resource.

I dislike the usability I encounter on their site. I can only display 11 music books at a time. This translates to over 1,000 screens to see all the music books they offer. I can use the subcategory feature to view Jazz books which are featured on 44 screens. Either way that’s a lot of clicking. It becomes an arduous task to build a music book wishlist on their site. I wish eBooks would redesign their Web site and increase the usability and user experience. I have been in contact with user support about this issue but they don’t design the site.

There are many eBook readers available. eBooks offer a guide to eBook readers.

Are you reading more eBooks than printed books? Let me know in your reply.

 

 

 

Jimi Hendrix – The Day I Was There

As a veteran of over 415 concerts in 49 years, one of my regrets is that I never saw Jimi Hendrix live in concert. Alas, that was not meant to happen.

I will soon have an opportunity to read about the personal memories of 400 eyewitness accounts of seeing Jimi live. Richard M. Houghton has a new book coming out on the 48th anniversary of Jimi Hendrix’s death, September 18, 2018, Jimi Hendrix, The Day I Was There.

I love the use of color that illustrates the book cover.

Richard M. Houghton is a music journalist/archivist. He has forged an interesting niche by writing a series of books from a rock music fan’s point of view. His, I Was There theme is a smart and welcome idea. The Jimi Hendrix book is the fifth I Was There title in the series.

He has written I Was There books about The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, and Pink Floyd.

He is working on several more I  Was There books for 2019 and beyond. Upcoming projects are fan memories of Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath (2019), the Faces, Cream and Neil Young.  I have some memories to share with Richard for those titles.

If there’s anyone else you’re passionate reading about, he’ d love to hear from you. Drop him a line at iwasatthatgig@gmail.com

I will be corresponding with Richard very soon 🙂

State of the Blues – Jeff Dunas

I picked up a copy of a new magazine to me, American Photo (March/April 2015) yesterday. The issue focuses on music photographers of then and now.

I just can’t get enough of music photography books. State of the Blues by photographer Jeff Dunas is an incredible portrait study of the artists who define the blues.

A hardcover book and paperback of the same title (1998) published by Aperture Foundation, includes photographs by Jeff Dunas, interviews with leading blues performers, a preface by John Lee Hooker, and an introduction by William Ferris.

Photograph Copyright Jeff Dunas

 

Patti Smith: America’s Punk Rock Rhapsodist by Eric Wendell

I’ve uncovered a new book about Patti Smith by Eric Wendell. It is from TEMPO, the Rowman & Littlefield Music Series on Rock, Pop and Culture.

I’ve yet to read this book so I withhold my comments until I can procure a copy.

The TEMPO Web site provides the General Guidelines and Proposals directions for volumes in its series. Ponders this option…

The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in 10 Songs – Greil Marcus

 

Greil Marcus selects ten songs recorded between 1956 and 2008, then proceeds to dramatize how each embodies rock ’n’ roll as a thing in itself, in the story it tells, inhabits, and acts out—a new language, something new under the sun.

The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in 10 Songs is available for purchase in stores and online. Disregard the September 2, 2014 availability date. I saw it on the shelf today at Barnes & Noble, Inc.

The Facebook page for this book is being managed by the Publisher, Yale University Press. It’s quite informative in positioning the 10 songs and includes the YouTube links for each song.

 

Jack White’s Innovative Third Man Books Publishing Imprint

I tip my hat once more to Jack White’s innovative business sense as he forges and casts the Third Man Books publishing imprint. His creative sense builds a fresh dimensional interpretation as we learn to respect and interact with printed matter.

Language LessonsVolume 1 is a 321 page hardbound book co-edited by Third Man’s Ben Swank and Chet Weise, a poet, musician and founder of the Nashville literary event, Poetry Sucks. The book is packed with new pieces from more than 20 acclaimed authors including Pulitzer Prize nominee in fiction Dale Ray Phillips; C.D. Wright, a National Book Award Finalist and National Book Critics Circle winner in poetry; and Adrian Matejka, a National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize finalist in poetry. Punk godfathers Richard Hell and Tav Falco also contributed non-fiction pieces.

As for the music portion of the set, the two vinyl LPs boast previously unheard material ranging from blues and pop to jazz and psychedelic-punk, courtesy of an eclectic group of artists like William Tyler, Destruction Unit, Ken Vandermark and Paul “Wine” Jones.

Each Language Lessons set will also include five frameable posters combining poems by Weise, Wright, Frank Stanford, Brian Barker and Jake Adam York with original art by former Big Boys guitarist Tim Kerr, former Hate comics illustrator Jim Blanchard, folk artist Butch Anthony and more.

Language Lessons is now available for pre-order over on the Third Man website.

Third Man Books will preview Language Lessons, Volume 1 on Saturday, July 26th during the Newport Folk Festival, where Jack White is also a headliner. The event will feature readings from Weise and other contributors Zachary Schomburg, Joshua Marie Wilkinson, Janaka Stucky, Sampson Starkweather, Paige Taggart and Kendra Decolo.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/jack-whites-third-man-records-starts-publishing-wing-20140722#ixzz38QasfcXV
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

101 Essential Rock Records

The music coffee table book that you will want to sink your teeth into is 101 Essential Rock Records, The Golden Age of Vinyl From The Beatles by Jeff Gold.

This volume is a tribute to the vinyl album and celebrates 101 of rock’s most influential records — from The Beatles’ 1963 début Please Please Me — through the Sex Pistols’ Never Mind the Bollocks (1977.)

The book also features contribution writings from musicians Devendra Banhart, David Bowie, Peter Buck (R.E.M.), Nels Cline (Wilco), Robyn Hitchcock, Johnny Marr (The Smiths), Graham Nash, and Suzanne Vega.

The book documents a period in recorded music where vinyl ruled with commanding authority. I love that it was a time when I was a rabid music collector and listener. I am proud to say that I own 60 of the 101 essential rock records 🙂 The book brings back the feelings of going to the record store to buy the rare cover edition of Blind Faith sold to me in a brown paper bag.

Jeff Gold is my new hero. He writes with such passion and conviction. It’s no wonder he is profiled by Rolling Stone as one of five “top collectors of high-end music memorabilia”.

Gold owns the music collectibles website Recordmecca.com, and writes about topics of interest to collectors on its associated blog. By the way the Web site is awesome!

This is a book you will want to squirrel away quality reading and listening time with as you explore the essential records.

There is a companion 101 Essential Rock Records Web site where you can see full sample pages of the four page spreads of the respective albums.

So here is the list in chronological order of the 101 Essential Rock Records, see how many you can check off 😉

101 Essential Rock Records 

1. The Beatles – Please Please Me
2. Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan
3. The Rolling Stones – The Rolling Stones
4. Bob Dylan – Another Side of Bob Dylan
5. Davy Graham – Folk Blues & Beyond…
6. Them – Angry Young Them
7. The Byrds – Mr. Tambourine Man
8. Bob Dylan – Highway 61 Revisited
9. The Who – My Generation
10. Simon & Garfunkel – Sounds of Silence
11. The Rolling Stones – Aftermath
12. The Beach Boys – Pet Sounds
13. Bob Dylan – Blonde On Blonde
14. The Mothers of Invention – Freak Out!
15. Yardbirds – Yardbirds
16. John Mayall with Eric Clapton – Blues Breakers
17. The Butterfield Blues Band – East West
18. The Beatles – Revolver
19. Jefferson Airplane – Takes Off
20. The Kinks – Face to Face
21. The 13th Floor Elevators – The Psychedelic Sounds Of
22. Laura Nyro – More Than A New Discovery
23. The Doors – The Doors
24. Jefferson Airplane – Surrealistic Pillow
25. The Velvet Underground & Nico – The Velvet Underground
26. Grateful Dead – Grateful Dead
27. The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Are You Experienced?
28. The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
29. Moby Grape – Moby Grape
30. Tim Buckley – Goodbye and Hello
31. Pink Floyd – The Piper At The Gates of Dawn
32. Buffalo Springfield – Again
33. Love – Forever Changes
34. Cream – Disraeli Gears
35. Traffic – Mr. Fantasy
36. The Who – The Who Sell Out
37. Leonard Cohen – Songs of Leonard Cohen
38. The Velvet Underground – White Light/White Heat
39. Fleetwood Mac – Fleetwood Mac
40. The Incredible String Band – The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter
41. The Zombies – Odessey & Oracle
42. Small Faces – Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake
43. The Band – Music From The Big Pink
44. Grateful Dead – Anthem of the Sun
45. Jeff Beck – Truth
46. Big Brother & The Holding Company – Cheap Thrills
47. The Byrds – Sweetheart of the Rodeo
48. The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Electric Ladyland
49. Van Morrison – Astral Weeks
50. The Beatles – The Beatles (White Album)
51. The Pretty Things – S.F. Sorrow
52. The Pentangle – Sweet Child
53. The Soft Machine – The Soft Machine
54. Creedence Clearwater Revival – Bayou Country
55. Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin
56. The Flying Burrito Bros. – The Gilded Palace of Sin
57. MC5 – Kick Out The Jams
58. Sly And The Family Stone – Stand!
59. Neil Young With Crazy Horse – Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere
60. Alexander Spence – Oar
61. The Who – Tommy
62. Crosby, Stills & Nash – Crosby, Stills & Nash
63. Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band – Trout Mask Replica
64. Blind Faith – Blind Faith
65. Jethro Tull – Stand Up
66. The Stooges – The Stooges
67. Nick Drake – Five Leaves Left
68. King Crimson – In The Court of The Crimson King
69. Vashti Bunyan – Just Another Diamond Day
70. Fairport Convention – Liege & Leaf
71. The Move – Shazam
72. James Taylor – Sweet Baby James
73. Black Sabbath – Black Sabbath
74. Emerson Lake & Palmer – Emerson Lake & Palmer
75. David Bowie – The Man Who Sold The World
76. Cat Stevens – Tea For The Tillerman
77. Carole King – Tapestry
78. Can – Tago Mago
79. Yes – The Yes Album
80. Joni Mitchell – Blue
81. The Allman Brothers Band – At Fillmore East
82. Genesis – Nursery Cryme
83. Faust – Faust
84. The Rolling Stones – Exile On Main St.
85. David Bowie – The Rise And Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars
86. Pink Floyd – The Dark Side of the Moon
87. Roxy Music – For Your Pleasure
88. Iggy And The Stooges – Raw Power
89. New York Dolls – New York Dolls
90. Big Star – #1 Record
91. Kraftwerk – Autobahn
92. Bruce Springsteen – Born To Run
93. Patti Smith – Horses
94. Ramones – Ramones
95. The Modern Lovers – The Modern Lovers
96. AC/DC – Dirty Deeds Done Cheap
97. Fleetwood Mac – Rumors
98. The Damned – The Damned
99. The Clash – The Clash
100. Talking Heads – Talking Heads: 77
101. Sex Pistols – Never Mind The Bollocks Here’s The Sex Pistols

 

2014, My Year for Digital Content

The number one reason I wanted an Apple iPad Air was for the ability to read my favorite music magazine, Uncut on the day of publication.

I am excited to report that I have achieved that New Years resolution starting with the Uncut Magazine February 2014 issue. Today, January 3rd, 2014 is the electronic publication date for the magazine. I am happily paging through my downloaded edition as I write this blog post. The digital magazine cost me $3.99. It only took a few seconds of transfer time via my Ethernet cable network/802.11ac wireless router for it to appear in the Apple Newsstand shelf.

What I really love is that I am snowbound here today with Winter Storm Hercules.

I didn’t have to get dressed, drive on the snowy streets or spend the gas to not find the new magazine.

The problem I previously encountered with Uncut Magazine were several. The delay lag between England and the magazine reaching the Barnes & Noble’s USA retail newsstand was significant. I typically had to wait anywhere from four to six weeks (or more) for the hard copy magazine. The delivery schedule was unpredictable with the print publication so there were times I went to Barnes & Noble and came back “empty-handed”.

The next issue was price. Uncut Magazine is an import publication so the newsstand price translated to $9.99 (versus $3.99 for digital) Granted you get a music CD each month with the hard copy edition but at least now I don’t have to “unglue” it from the cover 😉  I gave thought to ordering the digital magazine through Barnes & Noble online but they charge $5.99 an issue and force you to use the nook iPad application. (I am testing the applicability of iPad Reader Apps such as the nook, Readmill, amazon Kindle, Adobe Reader and Zinio for a future blog post…)

As a music enthusiast I depend upon Uncut Magazine as a resource for music information. Trust me Uncut Magazine delivers effectively with well written, researched, and coordinated articles. Today’s digital content medium ushers me into the year of digital content I have looked forward to embracing. I am an advocate of digital publishing and giving serious thought to redesigning how I will publish in 2014 and beyond.

Rock Music Photographers A-Z, Jay Blakesberg

One of the hippest rock music photographers on the scene is Jay Blakesberg. I like Jay’s fluid sense of articulation with jam band artists.

I especially enjoy how he photographs Carlos Santana. I was first drawn to Jay’s photography as a Santana fan. I kept seeing Jay’s work in Santana tour programs. Jay’s camaraderie with Carlos Santana is evident throughout his portfolio.

Copyright Jay Blakesberg

I also love Jay’s photographic work with the Grateful Dead.

Jay Blakesberg attends many music concerts and festivals. He is a consummate live music fan like myself. He embodies the music scene with a freshness which breathes special life into his photographs.

A part of me lives vicariously in San Francisco. Jay brings that music world to me in vivid and exciting ways.

Copyright Jay Blakesberg