A Conversation With George Clinton – May 12, 2015

A major event during the Red Bull Music Academy Festival New York, May 1-31, 2015 is A Conversation With George Clinton.  This event, being held at the Brooklyn Museum on May 12th, 2015. It requires a paid ticket to attend. This event is 18 and over.

Music as we know it would look a lot different (and less colorful) without the contributions of George Clinton. From his early musical beginnings in doo wop and as a songwriter at Motown, the hugely prolific Clinton went on to form the bands Parliament and Funkadelic, two of the most important groups of the 1970s. With Clinton at the helm of their Mothership, they uprooted funk from its earthly origins, sending it into outer space. Having made P-Funk a household name, Clinton went on to build an impressive solo discography, all the while inspiring a legion of West Coast rap artists and holding the reins of a sensational band called the P-Funk All Stars. As part of the Red Bull Music Academy Festival New York, George Clinton will sit down on the lecture couch for a rare, intimate chat about his momentous life and career.

I wonder if George Clinton will be selling and signing copies of his book that evening?

 

 

 

Viv Albertine, Clothes, Clothes, Clothes Music, Music, Music Boys, Boys, Boys

CLOTHES CLOTHES CLOTHES MUSIC MUSIC MUSIC BOYS BOYS BOYS

By Viv Albertine, 421 pages. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press

Viviane Katrina Louise “Viv” Albertine is a British singer and songwriter, best known as the guitarist for the all-female English punk group, The Slits. She dated Mick Jones while he was putting together his new band, The Clash. He later wrote “Train in Vain,” considered to be the band’s biggest hit, about her. Its refrain was a poison dart: “Did you stand by me? No not at all.”

After laying eyes on the cover photo of Patti Smith’s 1975 album “Horses,” taken by Robert Mapplethorpe, Viv writes: “I have never seen a girl who looks like this. She is my soul made visible, all the things I hide deep inside myself that can’t come out.” (Courtesy of the NY Times Book Review section, see related article below).