My Heartfelt Thanks For Your Support

Personal thanks to my 8,625 followers and many additional music readers in helping the MusicOfOurHeart WordPress blog achieve 600,000 views in eight years. It is rewarding to share a common bond of music amongst our respective hearts. I look forward to writing more about music and increasing your artistic enrichment.

Patti Smith: America’s Punk Rock Rhapsodist by Eric Wendell

I’ve uncovered a new book about Patti Smith by Eric Wendell. It is from TEMPO, the Rowman & Littlefield Music Series on Rock, Pop and Culture.

I’ve yet to read this book so I withhold my comments until I can procure a copy.

The TEMPO Web site provides the General Guidelines and Proposals directions for volumes in its series. Ponders this option…

2014, My Year for Digital Content

The number one reason I wanted an Apple iPad Air was for the ability to read my favorite music magazine, Uncut on the day of publication.

I am excited to report that I have achieved that New Years resolution starting with the Uncut Magazine February 2014 issue. Today, January 3rd, 2014 is the electronic publication date for the magazine. I am happily paging through my downloaded edition as I write this blog post. The digital magazine cost me $3.99. It only took a few seconds of transfer time via my Ethernet cable network/802.11ac wireless router for it to appear in the Apple Newsstand shelf.

What I really love is that I am snowbound here today with Winter Storm Hercules.

I didn’t have to get dressed, drive on the snowy streets or spend the gas to not find the new magazine.

The problem I previously encountered with Uncut Magazine were several. The delay lag between England and the magazine reaching the Barnes & Noble’s USA retail newsstand was significant. I typically had to wait anywhere from four to six weeks (or more) for the hard copy magazine. The delivery schedule was unpredictable with the print publication so there were times I went to Barnes & Noble and came back “empty-handed”.

The next issue was price. Uncut Magazine is an import publication so the newsstand price translated to $9.99 (versus $3.99 for digital) Granted you get a music CD each month with the hard copy edition but at least now I don’t have to “unglue” it from the cover 😉  I gave thought to ordering the digital magazine through Barnes & Noble online but they charge $5.99 an issue and force you to use the nook iPad application. (I am testing the applicability of iPad Reader Apps such as the nook, Readmill, amazon Kindle, Adobe Reader and Zinio for a future blog post…)

As a music enthusiast I depend upon Uncut Magazine as a resource for music information. Trust me Uncut Magazine delivers effectively with well written, researched, and coordinated articles. Today’s digital content medium ushers me into the year of digital content I have looked forward to embracing. I am an advocate of digital publishing and giving serious thought to redesigning how I will publish in 2014 and beyond.

Music Journalism A-Z – Additional Authors

I have looked high and low for a music journalist whose last name begins with X. I could not find anyone.

David Byrne speaking at the 2006 Future of Mus...
David Byrne speaking at the 2006 Future of Music Policy Summit hosted by the McGill University Schulich School of Music in Montreal, Canada (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So I decided to take this opportunity and go back through the alphabet of music journalists that I didn’t get to write about first time. I had some tough choices to make for the Music Journalism A-Z series when I decided I would only feature one music journalist by first letter of their last name.

There are many other music journalists that deserve major recognition for their accomplishments and invaluable insights.

The first music journalist I want to mention  is David Byrne. Most people freely associate him as a musician, songwriter, or as a visual artist. He writes a regular journal that I subscribe to,  David Byrne’s Journal. David Byrne is a technology leader who assuaged our collective consciousness. He articulates a much-needed voice  of expression for artistic intelligentsia. He has authored nine books to date.

  • True Stories (1986)
  • Strange Ritual, Chronicle Books (1995)
  • Your Action World (1999)
  • The New Sins (Los Nuevos Pecados) (2001)
  • David Byrne Asks You: What Is It? Smart Art Press (2002)
  • Envisioning Emotional Epistemological Information with DVD (2003)
  • Arboretum, (2006)
  • Bicycle Diaries (2009)
  • How Music Works (2012)

The letter C proved challenging as there were two other music journalists of renown I wanted to write about, Robert Christgau and Nate Chinen.

Christgau is the cornerstone of music criticism and his Consumer Guide has helped me purchase  fantastic recordings over the decades.

Nate Chinen constantly turns me on to new jazz sources via his blog and music reviews in the New York Times.

English: on the
English: on the “Music in the ’00s” panel, 2010 Pop Conference, EMPSFM, Seattle, Washington. (Photo credit: Joe Mabel)

The next music journalist I wanted to circle back to is David Fricke, Senior Editor at Rolling Stone. He authors the “Fricke’s Picks” column in the Rolling Stone record review section.

He is responsible for the 100 Greatest Guitarists Of All Time special edition issue and column that gets a lot of views on my music blog post as a two-part series that I wrote about last year.

The letter G had several music journalists I could have also written about and that have my undying respect. Those journalists include Gary Giddins, Mikal Gilmore, Ralph J. Gleason and Peter Guralnick. I had just written about Peter Guralnick in January so I faded on him for this month.

Gary Giddins has been a long-time columnist for the Village Voice and unarguably the world’s preeminent jazz critic who has won an unparalleled six ASCAP–Deems Taylor Awards, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Peabody Award in Broadcasting, as well as a lifetime achievement award from the Jazz Journalists Association. He’s also received the Raiph J. Gleason Music Book Award.

Mikal Gilmore is a friend on Facebook. I enjoy his posts and love the articles he writes for Rolling Stone Magazine. He has two interviews with Bob Dylan that are must reads in the latest Rolling Stone Special Issue.

Ralph J. Gleason had a powerful influence on me as a music author of depth and substance. He contributed for many years to the San Francisco Chronicle, was a founding editor of Rolling Stone magazine, and was co-founder of the Monterey Jazz Festival. He represented both pop and jazz music with equal intensity. I especially love his liner notes for the pivotal jazz recording Bitches Brew by Miles Davis.

I debated for too long about featuring Nat Hentoff for the letter H. I struggled to do him justice in my draft blog post. I thoroughly enjoy his music sociopolitical bent. He is a jazz subject matter authority and my kinda liberal 😉

Richard Meltzer wrote one of my all time favorite rock music epics, The Aesthetics of Rock. I’m on my second copy now 😉

It was a total toss of the coin between Robert Palmer and Jon Pareles of the New York Times. I can’t get enough of Mr. Pareles writing. I’m drawn to his prose like a moth to a flame.

Jon Pareles Writer Jon Pareles (L) interviews singer/musician Chris Cornell at the New York Times TimesTalk during the 2012 NY Times Arts & Leisure weekend>> at The Times Center on January 7, 2012 in New York City.

I still feel like I could write about 25 more music journalists in this post. What a great well of knowledge to draw upon.

Taking It To The Streets

I followed through on the first of my 2013 New Years Resolutions. I am branding MusicOfOurHeart as my second line of business. This is an evolutionary step to form a later stage secondary career as a digital music journalist. Technically I have been a music writer since 1975 (38 years) My primary career continues to be in education as an information technology professor and instructional technologist (29 years).

I will be leveraging my long-term music interests to produce a secondary revenue stream to help offset my costs as a dedicated music fan.  It’s always been an active pursuit of mine to find a creative way for my music  hobby to help pay for itself.

By the way how do you like my new business card? 😉

front2

Several recent accomplishments with the music industry have boosted my confidence to step up.

1. Just like the brand new deli or convenience store on the corner where you live, I can proudly hang the first $100 bill earned with this business. Thanks to WordPress WordAds I received that $100 via PayPal last month! Monetizing a blog without diluting your content is doable. I am convinced I will see a five fold increase in monetization revenue in 2013.

2. I am being requested to write more music blog posts for leading companies. Through my journalism connection with Ti.dal I have become the top professional music blogger with SONY Popmarket Backstage. This is the official Blog for Sony Music‘s Legacy Recording Division. I will soon hit 200 blog posts online with that strategic music business partner.

I have also been asked to write music blog posts for Pepsi. I wrote a music blog post about Justin Timberlake‘s “Suit and Tie” recording that he featured last night on the Grammy Awards with Jay-Z. I have written for the Pepsi SuperBowl Halftime events that featured Beyonce. I was also asked over the weekend to write a blog post for last night’s CBS Grammy Awards event. You can find those blog posts elsewhere on this blog.

The challenge for me is to keep up my existing professional music contacts that I have written proudly with for free for all these years yet find a way to begin to charge reasonable fees for my writing.

3. I have also been requested to write an article about two upcoming related events the launch of Talent Army and The Big Apple Indie Music Series . I am developing greater recognition through LinkedIn for my increased music journalism skills.

4. I have started writing a book about live music performance. The recent series about music journalism is helping  actualize that I can become a recognized digital music journalist in the sea of music bloggers.

5. I still plan to have 1-2 major music magazine articles published in 2013. The year is still young 😉

So that is why I am Taking It To The Streets, no make that Taking It To The Web.

Micheal McDonald echoes my sentiment: You Don’t Know Me, But I’m Your Brother

That’s what I plan to do 😉

Let me know your thoughts below. As always thanks for reading and believing.

Music Journalism A-Z – Daphne Carr

I appropriate the letter C music journalism post to Daphne Carr who helms the independent publishing project for best music writing.

Daphne Carr

I discovered the resolve of Daphne Carr in my pursuit of music writing excellence. First and foremost Daphne has been the series editor of Best Music Writing (Da Capo Press 2007-present). The Best Music Writing book series (2000-2011) was published by Da Capo Press until the 2012 edition.

Daphne Carr is taking the Best of Music Writing publication independent in 2013. Last year a  Kickstarter project was created and successfully funded to carry out that goal.

Launch Best Music Writing as an independently published book series

I pledged $15 to get an e-book version of Best Music Writing 2012 delivered to me on launch day and a thank you postcard. Launch day has not been announced yet but I remain hopeful for future communications in this regard.

Daphne Carr has started Feedback Press which provides a home for new writing about music, along with other reflections on culture and fiction. Feedback’s titles will be available in print and electronic editions.

The first publication from Feedback Press was Pop Papers, a series of short works about music that were  released simultaneously in print and digital formats. The first five titles in the series (Session One) had their début at the IASPM-US/Experience Music Project Pop Conference (March 22-25 at New York University).

I am very interested in this music writing appreciation community. The Music Book club meets periodically in Greenpoint, Brooklyn at WORD the Independent Bookseller to discuss music writings and published works. I hope to attend one of their 2013 meetings the writer series looks interesting.

So hopefully you have a better inkling why Daphne Carr’s momentum matters in the dynamic evolution of music publishing. I know I do 😉